Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Dry Mouth

I'm not a doctor but in my amateur opinion I'd say that water makes for a more than adequate solution to any 'dry mouth' issues you may experience.

In fact, it's not just mouths that can be made less dry by water.

I don't want to blind you with science so let's just say that water is one of the wettest things in the world. It's brilliant at being wet and can be used to make almost anything less dry.

It definitely works with mouths. Well it certainly does with mine. In fact my mouth was feeling a bit dry only two or three minutes ago. I drank a glass of water. Problem solved.

Of course water isn't always available in a big city like London so it's worth pausing to consider how I might deal with a dry mouth if I found myself unable to locate drinking water. If only someone could invent a dry mouth spray of some kind.

Of course while an amateur like me is capable of coming up with the glass-of-water solution it would need an expert to come up with a dry mouth spray... after all, it's not like it's going to be mainly water now is it?

Oh. It is.

23 comments:

cathy said...

at least it does the job without you having to pee much...tsk, the side effects of hydration.

Jack said...

You'll only have to pee less because there's less of it than in a glass. You should just have a tiny sip of water then swill it round your mouth and it'll have the same effect.

It does amuse/depress (there should be a word to describe that feeling. A bit like when you spot a really pathetic story in the Mail. It's amusing in its patheticness, but depressing that people will be taking notice of it) me when companies put "aqua" on the ingredients of things in order to pretend that it's something more exotic than the stuff you get out of your taps.

Rod Begbie said...

While mocking greedy/foolish pharmacists is fun...

"Dry Mouth" is a recognised medical condition: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xerostomia -- Common in those who've gone through chemotherapy.

Drinking excessive water when suffering from dry mouth can increase the symptoms, so sprays such as this (with glycerine) are really very helpful.

John Braine said...

Yeah what Rod says... If I didn't know any better, I'd think this was ridicilous but lot's of medications have the side-effect of a really dry mouth and water doesn't really cut it.

Anonymous said...

I have an autoimmune disease called Sjögren's (http://www.sjogrens.org/)...one of the symptoms is dry mouth. I use a spray, mouthwash, and gel and, yeah, drink plenty of water. Sadly, none of them makes my mouth feel okay. If you don't understand the need for certain products, be grateful (and research them if you're curious.) Kindly don't mock them or the people who use them.

tomelement said...

Oh No, you've done it now. It's your very own Brand/Ross scandal. How could you callously mock people with autoimmune diseases, you're finished in this business!

Dave Gorman said...

I'm not intending to mock anyone... I'm merely pointing out that at first glance it looks ridiculous.

I knew there had to be a proper purpose for it - I wasn't seriously under the impression that they were marketing it as an alternative to a glass of water. (That said, the description on the bottle does read like they're simply selling a lifestyle choice.)

It's a gut reaction to a product that at first glance appears unnecessary. It's a conversation I'd have with someone if I saw it on a shelf, not a carved-in-stone condemnation of its very existence.

Kevan Marriner said...

Why is it that when listed as an ingredient water is never described as, well, water. Aqua! What's that all about. Is it intended to give it an air of scientific glamour?

What a load of old testiculi.

Emma said...

Oh Dave, you scoffed at the sacred dry mouth spray cow. It moos in your face.

Tough gig.

Murk said...

Actually, water isn't that great at wetting things. It's due to surface tension, which is why if you put a little water on a surface in tends to bead rather than form a wet layer.

Adding soap makes water good at wetting - hence, well..... soap.

.... or was that taking things a touch too seriously?

thriftymrs said...

A must have item. Non?

Ali Taylor said...

I've invented a spray called "Between The Lines" it can be taken aurally but not literally.

It's £2.99. Please get in touch if you'd like to order.

John Braine said...

I think the photo on the label is pretty funny in itself. "Ladies, got a dry mouth? Well close you eyes, open your mouth and wait for a surprise!"

RobC said...

I think water's described as 'aqua' on pharmaceutical labels because of some kind of EU regulation... I forget the details, but the idea is that it's understandable across the EU - assuming you can read Latin.

Kevan said...

I think its great that the Eurocrats have such a well developed sense of altruism.

Now we all know there is water in it (sorry, aqua), that leaves us with trying to figure out what the rest of the 'science' is that this stuff is full of.

Anyone know what cetylpyridinium chloride is? Perhaps it would be obvious if they described that in Latin too!

Abigail Smith said...

It's got electrolytes. It's what plants crave.

Anonymous said...

Each of those ingredients is in there for a reason (very few companies would waste money on a raw material they don't actually need). As I didn't design it I can't guarantee I'm 100% correct but:

Aqua = Water, helps disperse the product around the mouth and yes making your mouth wetter.
Glycerin = Helps moisturise the mouth and keeps it feeling lubricated.
Xylitol = helps stimulate own saliva flow.
Sodium phosphate/Disodiumphosphate = buffering system to keep it at the right pH
Polysorbate 20 = non-ionic surfactant, helps solubilise some of the other ingredients and stops them separating out, may also help spreading the product around the mouth.
Hydroxymethylcellulose = A cellulose gum, will help the mouth feel moisturised and lubricated.
PEG-40 = Either in there to help incorporate some of the other ingredients during manufacture or to help keep the mouth feel lubricated.
Hydrogenated castor oil = Again will help with keeping the mouth feel moisturised for longer.
Aroma = Standard INCI name for flavour
Cetylpyridinium chloride = preservative
Sodium saccharin = sweetener to make it taste nice
Limonene = one of the flavour components which has to be listed separatly (another EU regulation but I forget which) because some people are allergic to it.

Ingredient names are standardised (INCI) so you always know what you're getting and nobody tries to fob you off by calling water "Magic Ingredient X!"

danmatley said...

Looks like you've used it quite a bit...it's half empty

Ben Nuttall said...

Calm down, people!

Merely out of curiosity (honestly - I'm not in a hurry to buy one), how much are they selling them for, Dave?

Alex said...

Good to see that you've got the 'expert' brand (a bit like the 'celebrity' meatloaf?). Maybe the amateur one is just plain 'aqua'.

stevoarnold said...

I was curious once when I was changing the water in the radiator on my old xr2 a few years ago and someone advised me partially refil it with a bottle of "water wetter". I refused to ask for it in a shop but actually later found out that it is a real product and does actually make water MORE wet!
I wonder what would happen if you combined water wetter with this miracle mouth spray?? Something comparible to eating an opal fruit I imagine...

Anonymous said...

This product is meant for people who have a dry mouth 24/7. For sure water is fine during the day, but at night it's a different story. If I just use water at night then I am sipping 30-40 times a night and never get any sleep. If I use a dry mouth spray then this is reduced to about 4-6 sprays a night and I manage to get a little much needed sleep. You show your ignorance with this article.

Dave Gorman said...

Thanks Anonymous. Your criticism is entirely valid. I'm not sure how or why you ended up looking at a 4 year old blog post or why you didn't bother to read the other comments to see that it's already been discussed pretty fully, but yes, you're right.